So what troubles the industry? Poor scripts? Yes, but that’s not the only factor going against our movies. Wrong economics is another vital aspect. And it all starts with actors’ remuneration and film-makers getting overtly indulgent and over-spending on the making of their films. When the film is eventually complete, it carries the burden of a heavy price, which, most of the times, is difficult to recover due to the wrong costs.

In most cases, it’s not the film that fails, but the price that fails. Also, what we may consider ‘Hot’ within the industry may not necessarily be ‘Hot’ outside the industry. The avid moviegoer may not be as excited as we are about a film. That explains why we go completely wrong in our calculations. We sit in our ivory towers, feeling eternally optimistic that the junta would throng the cineplexes the moment the advance booking counters open, but we are in for a rude shock when our world comes crumbling down.

Also, it has been proved that very few solo hero films have the power to lure audiences to cineplexes. Solo Aamir, SRK, Salman, Hrithik, Ranbir and Akshay starrers have consistently opened well. Irrespective of how their films fare, the fact remains that they succeed in attracting patrons to cinema halls on Day 1 on the strength of their star power. Subsequently, the content of the film does the talking and star power takes a backseat.

That brings me to JHOOTHA HI SAHI, which was expected to repeat the success of JAANE TU YA JAANE NA. The industry was looking up to the film for varied reasons, but the content of the film proved a downer. Also, the wrong economics. Besides, a prominent film-maker made an extremely valid observation on John. People like to see him as a pin-up guy, as a star, not as a simpleton in films like AASHAYEIN and JHOOTHA HI SAHI.

Another reason that went against JHOOTHA HI SAHI was its wrong costing. The film was too expensive and John’s brawny shoulders couldn’t carry the burden of a weak script and heavy costs combined. Businesswise, the film is one of the major shockers of 2010.

RAKHT CHARITRA has been made in three versions [Hindi, Tamil and Telugu] and I am told that the makers will easily recover the costs of Part I from Telugu and Hindi versions. The Hindi version hasn’t garnered the figures that were expected from it, but the business of Telugu version is extra-ordinary.

HISSS attracted audiences at single screens, but the multiplex junta, which contributes a big chunk to the booty, stayed away. The film is weak in merits, but the generous skin show by Ms. Sherawat found its share of takers in U.P. and some centres. As for DUS TOLA, the film went completely unnoticed, adding to the tally of also-rans.

Source – BH

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